ISIT 2014: a few more talks

Identification via the Broadcast Channel
Annina Bracher (ETH Zurich, Switzerland); Amos Lapidoth (ETHZ, Switzerland)
The title pretty much describes it — there are two receivers which are both looking out for a particular message. This is the identification problem, in which the receiver only cares about a particular message (but we don’t know which one) and we have to design a code such that they can detect the message. The number of messages is 2^{2^{nC}} where C is the Shannon capacity of the DMC. In the broadcast setting we run into the problem that the errors for the two receivers are entangled. However, their message sets are disjoint. The way out is to look at the average error for each (averaged over the other user’s message). The main result is that the rates only depend on the conditional marginals, and they have a strong converse.

Efficient compression of monotone and m-modal distributions
Jayadev Acharya (University of California, San Diego, USA); Ashkan Jafarpour (University of California, San Diego, USA); Alon Orlitsky (University of California, San Diego, USA); Ananda Theertha Suresh (University of California, San Diego, USA)
A monotone distribution is a distribution on \mathbb{N} such that the probabilities are non-increasing. The redundancy for this class is infinite, alas, so they restrict the support to size k (where k can be large). They propose a two-step compression scheme in which the first step is to approximate the true distribution with a piecewise constant step distribution, and then use a compression scheme for step distributions.

Writing on a Dirty Paper in the Presence of Jamming
Amitalok J Budkuley (Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India); Bikash K Dey (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India); Vinod M Prabhakaran (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India)
Ahh, jamming. A topic near and dear to my heart. This paper takes a game-theoretic approach to jamming in a DPC setup: “the capacity of the channel in the presence of the jammer is the unique Nash equilibrium utility of the zero sum communication game between the user and the jammer.” This is a mutual information game, and they show that i.i.d. Gaussian jamming and dirty paper coding are a Nash equilibrium. I looked at an AVC version of this problem in my thesis, and the structure is quite a bit different, so this was an interesting different take on the same problem — how can we use the state information to render adversarial interference as harmless as noise?

Stable Grassmann Manifold Embedding via Gaussian Random Matrices
Hailong Shi (Tsinghua University & Department of Electronic Engineering, P.R. China); Hao Zhang (TsinghuaUniversity, P.R. China); Gang Li (Tsinghua University, P.R. China); Xiqin Wang (Tsinghua University, P.R. China)
This was in the session I was chairing. The idea is that you are given a subspace (e.g., a point on the Grassman manifold) and you want to see what happens when you randomly project this into a lower-dimensional subspace using an i.i.d. Gaussian matrix a la Johnson-Lindenstrauss. The JL Lemma says that projections are length-preserving. Are they also volume-preserving? It turns out that they are (no surprise). The main tools are measure concentration results together with a union bound over a covering set.

Is “Shannon capacity of noisy computing” zero?
Pulkit Grover (Carnegie Mellon University, USA)
Yes. I think. Maybe? Pulkit set up a physical model for computation and used a cut-set argument to show that the total energy expenditure is high. I started looking at the paper in the proceedings and realized that it’s significantly different than the talk though, so I’m not sure I really understood the argument. I should read the paper more carefully. You should too, probably.

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