CFP: 2015 Information Theory Workshop (ITW), Jeju Island

I am on the TPC for ITW 2015 in Jeju Island, South Korea.

The 2015 IEEE Information Theory Workshop will take place in Jeju Island, Korea, from October 11 to October 15, 2015. Jeju Island is the largest island in Korea and is located in the Pacific Ocean just off the south-western tip of the Korean peninsula. Jeju Island is a volcanic island with a mountainous terrain, a dramatic rugged coastline and spectacular watershed courses. The Island has a unique culture as well as natural beauty. It is a living folk village, with approximately 540,000 people. As a result of its isolated location and romantic tropical image, Jeju Island has become a favorite retreat with honeymooners and tourists. The tour programs of the conference will also provide participants with the opportunity to feel and enjoy some of the island’s fascinating attractions.

Special topics of emphasis include:

  • Big data
  • Coding theory
  • Communication theory
  • Computational biology
  • Interactive communication
  • Machine learning
  • Network information theory
  • Privacy and security
  • Signal processing
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2015 Bellairs Workshop on Large-Scale Inference and Optimization

A few weeks ago I got to go to Bellairs in Holetown, Barbados for a workshop organized by Mike Rabbat and Mark Coates of McGill University. It’s a small workshop, mostly for Mike and Mark’s students, and it’s a chance to interact closely and perhaps start some new research collaborations. Here’s a brief summary of the workshop as I remember it from my notes.

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Readings

The Magician’s Land [Lev Grossman] : The finale of Grossman’s series. In a sense it had all the right pieces, but somehow it felt less specific and grounded to me, perhaps because the world was no longer “new” or because I felt like there was a need to “finish things up.” Of course, if you read the first two you have to read this one, so it’s not like I could not-recommend it. I was still quite enjoyable.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage [Haruki Murakami]: This also felt a bit slight with respect to other books of Murakami, but also “clean” in a way that I appreciated. I also now have to listen to more Liszt. Tsukuru Tazaki feels “colorless” and empty, shunned by his old childhood friends. He finally tries to seek out why, which turns out to be more surprising than he thought. As with much of Murakami’s work, the “mysteriousness” of women has this negative tint that makes me uncomfortable. This book, unlike 1Q84 or others, has very little magical realism going on, so it could be a good recommendation for someone who is less of a fan of that aspect of Murakami’s work.

Soy Sauce For Beginners [Kirstin Chen]: The story of Gretchen Lin, a 30-year old who has moved back to Singapore from SF to work at the family soy sauce factory after her marriage fell apart, this novel is part Gretchen’s painful journey towards self-discovery and resolution with her family, and partly an introduction to Singapore for the non-familiar reader. The latter part will appeal to some but at times I wanted less explanation and to be forced into trying to make sense of cultural elements myself. In this sense it’s a sort of novel of cultural translation. That being said, the best part of this book is how true and messy the story really felt. The family (and business) are dysfunctional, and Gretchen has a lot to come to terms with regarding herself, her marriage, and her relationship to this family.

The Name of The Wind / The Wise Man’s Fear [Patrick Rothfuss] : I should make myself promise to not read epic fantasy series that are not completed. Told in a kind of story-within-a-story, these books were a great way to unwind over the vacation. If you like those bards plus wizards coming of age stories, this one is for you. Also: plenty of unrequited love.

The Lowland [Jhumpa Lahiri] : I had read the opening of this book as a short story, but the novel is another beast entirely. Two brothers in Kolkata, one a Naxalite, the other looking to go to grad school in the US, and a torn apart and stitched together family in the US. While reading this I kept thinking of the movie Boyhood, which rather abruptly jumped years into the future to catch the family’s story at another time. This book does the same, but the shifts felt more jarring to me; I did not understand who there characters were quite as well. I think I had to suspend my disbelief a few times for some of the narrative choices. However, in retrospect it is because I think I didn’t quite get the characters, or I had misconceptions. Regardless, I think this is a story that helps complicate the story of middle-class Indian immigrant families, and is worth giving a read.

House of Suns [Alastair Reynolds] : Space opera, on a grand scale, but still grounded in our galaxy with humans, rather than the more distant and alien Culture novels of Banks. As Cosma would put it, mind candy, and a nice beach read.