CFP: T-SIPN Special Issue on Distributed Signal Processing for Security and Privacy in Networked Cyber-Physical Systems

IEEE Signal Processing Society
IEEE Transactions on Signal and Information Processing over Networks
Special Issue on Distributed Signal Processing for Security and Privacy in Networked Cyber-Physical Systems

GUEST EDITORS:

SCOPE
The focus of this special issue is on distributed information acquisition, estimation, and adaptive learning for security and privacy in the context of networked cyber-physical systems (CPSs) which are engineering systems with integrated computational and communication capabilities that interact with humans through cyber space. The CPSs have recently emerged in several practical applications of engineering importance including aerospace, industrial/manufacturing process control, multimedia networks, transportation systems, power grids, and medical systems. The CPSs typically consist of both wireless and wired sensor/agent networks with different capacity/reliability levels where the emphasis is on real-time operations, and performing distributed, secure, and optimal sensing/processing is the key concern. To satisfy these requirements of the CPSs, it is of paramount importance to design innovative “Signal Processing” tools to provide unprecedented performance and resource utilization efficiency.

A significant challenge for implementation of signal processing solutions in CPSs is the difficulty of acquiring data from geographically distributed observation nodes and storing/processing the aggregated data at the fusion center (FC). As such, there has been a recent surge of interest in development of distributed and collaborative signal processing technologies where adaptation, estimation, and/or control are performed locally and communication is limited to local neighborhoods. Distributed signal processing over networked CPSs, however, raise significant privacy and security concerns as local observations are being shared by neighboring nodes in a collaborative and iterative fashion. On one hand, applications of CPSs are severely safety critical where potential cyber and physical attacks by adversaries on signal processing modules could lead to a variety of severe consequences including customer information leakage, destruction of infrastructures, and endangering human lives. On the other hand, the need for cooperation be- tween neighboring nodes makes it imperative to prevent the disclosure of sensitive local information during distributed information fusion step. At the same time, efficient usage of available resources (communication, computation, bandwidth, and energy) is a pre-requisite for productive operation of the CPSs. To accommodate these critical aspects of CPSs, it is of great practical importance and theoretical significance to develop advanced “Secure and Privacy Preserving Distributed Signal Processing” solutions.

The spirit and wide scope of distributed signal processing in revolutionized CPSs calls for novel and innovative techniques beyond conventional approaches to provide precise guarantees on security and privacy of CPSs. The objective of this special issue is to further advance recent developments of distributed signal processing to practical aspects of CPSs for real-time processing and monitoring of the underlying system in a secure and privacy preserving manner while avoiding degradation of the processing performance and preserving the valuable resources. To provide a systematic base for future advancements of CPSs, this special issue aims to provide a research venue to investigate distributed signal processing techniques with adaptation, cooperation, and learning capabilities which are secure against cyber-attacks and protected against privacy leaks. The emphasis of this special issue is on distributed/network aspects of security and privacy in CPSs. Papers with primary emphasis on forensics and security will be redirected to IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security (TIFS). Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Security and Privacy of distributed signal processing in networked CPSs.
  • Distributed and secure detection, estimation, and information fusion.
  • Security and privacy of consensus and diffusive strategies in networked systems.
  • Secure and privacy preserving distributed adaptation and learning.
  • Security and privacy of distributed sensor resource management in networked systems.
  • Distributed event-based estimation/control in networked CPSs.
  • Detection and identification of potential attacks on distributed signal processing mechanisms.
  • Application domains including but not limited to, smart grids, camera networks, multimedia network, and vehicular networks.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
Authors are invited to submit original research contributions by following the detailed instructions given in the “Information for Authors” page or TSIPN page. Manuscripts should be submitted via Scholar One(Manuscript Central) system. Questions about the special issue should be directed to the Guest Editors.

IMPORTANT DATES:

    • Paper submission deadline: December 15, 2016
    • Notification of the first review: March 1, 2017
    • Revised paper submission: April 15, 2017
    • Notification of the re-review: June 15, 2017
    • Minor revision deadline: August 1, 2017
    • Final notification: September 1, 2017
    • Final manuscript due: October 15, 2017

Publication: Advance posting in IEEExplore as soon as authors approve galley proofs

Expected inclusion in an issue: March 2018

CFP: IEEE JSTSP and T-SIPN Special Issues on Graph Signal Processing

IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing
IEEE Transactions on Signal and Information Processing over Networks
Special Issues on Graph Signal Processing

Numerous applications rely on the processing of high-dimensional data that resides on irregular or otherwise unordered structures which are naturally modeled as networks (such as social, economic, energy, transportation, telecommunication, sensor, and neural, to name a few). The need for new tools to process such data has led to the emergence of the field of graph signal processing, which merges algebraic and spectral graph theoretic concepts with computational harmonic analysis to process signals on structures such as graphs. This important new paradigm in signal processing research, coupled with its numerous applications in very different domains, has fueled the rapid development of an inter-disciplinary research community that has been working on theoretical aspects of graph signal processing and applications to diverse problems such as big data analysis, coding and compression of 3D point clouds, biological data processing, and brain network analysis.

The purpose of these special issues is to gather the latest advances in graph signal processing and disseminate new ideas and experiences in this emerging field to a broad audience. We encourage the submission of papers with new results, methods or applications in graph signal processing. In particular, the topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

  • Sampling and recovery of graph signals
  • Graph filter and filter bank design
  • Uncertainty principles and other fundamental limits
  • Graph signal transforms
  • Graph topology inference
  • Prediction and learning in graphs
  • Statistical graph signal processing
  • Non-linear graph signal processing
  • Applications to visual information processing
  • Applications to neuroscience and other medical fields
  • Applications to economics and social networks
  • Applications to various infrastructure networks

Submission Procedure:
Prospective authors should follow the instructions given on the IEEE JSTSP webpages and submit their manuscript with the web submission system at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jstsp-ieee. The decisions on whether the accepted papers will be published in IEEE JSTSP or IEEE TSIPN will depend on the respective themes of the papers and will be made by the Guest Editors.

Schedule (all deadlines are firm):

Manuscript due: Nov 1, 2016
First Review Completed: Jan 1, 2017
Revised manuscript due: Mar 1, 2017
Second Review Completed: May 1, 2017
Final manuscript due: June 1, 2017
Publication date: September 2017

Guest Editors:

  • Pier-Luigi Dragotti, Imperial College, London (p.dragotti@imperial.ac.uk)
  • Pascal Frossard, EPFL, Lausanne (pascal.frossard@epfl.ch)
  • Antonio Ortega, USC, Los Angeles (ortega@sipi.usc.edu)
  • Michael Rabbat, McGill University, Montreal (michael.rabbat@mcgill.ca)
  • Alejandro Ribeiro, UPenn, Philadelphia (aribeiro@seas.upenn.edu)

CFP: IEEE T-SIPN Special Issue on Distributed Information Processing in Social Networks

IEEE Signal Processing Society
IEEE Transactions on Signal and Information Processing over Networks
Special Issue on Distributed Information Processing in Social Networks

Over the past few decades, online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have significantly changed the way people communicate and share information with each other. The opinion and behavior of each individual are heavily influenced through interacting with others. These local interactions lead to many interesting collective phenomena such as herding, consensus, and rumor spreading. At the same time, there is always the danger of mob mentality of following crowds, celebrities, or gurus who might provide misleading or even malicious information. Many efforts have been devoted to investigating the collective behavior in the context of various network topologies and the robustness of social networks in the presence of malicious threats. On the other hand, activities in social networks (clicks, searches, transactions, posts, and tweets) generate a massive amount of decentralized data, which is not only big in size but also complex in terms of its structure. Processing these data requires significant advances in accurate mathematical modeling and computationally efficient algorithm design. Many modern technological systems such as wireless sensor and robot networks are virtually the same as social networks in the sense that the nodes in both networks carry disparate information and communicate with constraints. Thus, investigating social networks will bring insightful principles on the system and algorithmic designs of many engineering networks. An example of such is the implementation of consensus algorithms for coordination and control in robot networks. Additionally, more and more research projects nowadays are data-driven. Social networks are natural sources of massive and diverse big data, which present unique opportunities and challenges to further develop theoretical data processing toolsets and investigate novel applications. This special issue aims to focus on addressing distributed information (signal, data, etc.) processing problems in social networks and also invites submissions from all other related disciplines to present comprehensive and diverse perspectives. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Dynamic social networks: time varying network topology, edge weights, etc.
  • Social learning, distributed decision-making, estimation, and filtering
  • Consensus and coordination in multi-agent networks
  • Modeling and inference for information diffusion and rumor spreading
  • Multi-layered social networks where social interactions take place at different scales or modalities
  • Resource allocation, optimization, and control in multi-agent networks
  • Modeling and strategic considerations for malicious behavior in networks
  • Social media computing and networking
  • Data mining, machine learning, and statistical inference frameworks and algorithms for handling big data from social networks
  • Data-driven applications: attribution models for marketing and advertising, trend prediction, recommendation systems, crowdsourcing, etc.
  • Other topics associated with social networks: graphical modeling, trust, privacy, engineering applications, etc.

Important Dates:

  • Manuscript submission due: September 15, 2016
  • First review completed: November 1, 2016
  • Revised manuscript due: December 15, 2016
  • Second review completed: February 1, 2017
  • Final manuscript due: March 15, 2017
  • Publication: June 1, 2017

Guest Editors:

Multiple Postdoc Openings at USC

Prof. Urbashi Mitra is looking for multiple postdocs. Given that this is the time of year when the future looks murkiest, these are great opportunities!

I am seeking multiple post-doctoral researchers are sought with expertise in one or more areas: Communication Theory, (Statistical) Signal Processing, Controls, Information Theory, and Machine Learning. In particular, the following expertises are of interest: structured inference (sparse approximation, low rank matrix completion, tensor signal processing, graph signal processing); multi-terminal information theory, or information theory at the boundaries of control or signal processing; distributed control, consensus methods and partially observable Markov Decision Process modeling and algorithms; modern optimization methods; or biological communications, signal processing or information theory.

The successful applicants will be expected to perform innovative translational research, mentor PhD students, give oral presentations, write journal papers, and participate in grant writing and project management. There will be significant opportunities for research leadership and interaction with funding agencies.

Ideally, the successful applicants will start in Summer 2016.

Please have your interested graduate students apply using the following portal:

https://jobs.usc.edu/postings/63539

In addition to a cv and research statement, the applicants are requested to have three letters of reference uploaded to the system as well.

Postdoc at Rutgers ECE in Network Science and Statistical Inference

My colleague Laleh Najafizadeh has a postdoc position at Rutgers!

The NeuroImaging Laboratory at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Rutgers University is seeking a highly motivated Postdoctoral Fellow to work on an exciting interdisciplinary project at the intersection of Neuroscience, Network Science, and Statistical Learning and Inference. The applicant will have a unique opportunity to be involved in both the theoretical and experimental development of the project.
The position is open to candidates with a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Statistics or related areas, who are self-driven, have a strong background in mathematics, and have excellent analytical and communication skills. Prior experience of working with neuroimaging data (any modality) is a plus. The appointment is available immediately and will be for 1 year.

Please email your current CV and contact information for three references to Dr. Laleh Najafizadeh at laleh.najafizadeh@rutgers.edu. Early submission is strongly encouraged.

The Rutgers ECE NeuroImaging Laboratory is designed to accommodate both single-subject and hyperscanning multi-modal functional neuroimaging experiments, and is equipped with high- resolution EEG and optical imaging (fNIRS) systems. More information about the laboratory can be found at the lab homepage.

The laboratory is located in Rutgers University–New Brunswick, which is situated at the center of the Northeast Corridor, within 20 miles of Princeton, 40 miles of New York City and 70 miles of Philadelphia.

There exist several opportunities to collaborate with clinicians at Rutgers University. Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences is home to the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine as well as Rutgers School of Public Health. The Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the flagship hospital of Robert Wood Johnson Health System, is also located few miles from the ECE Department.

Rutgers is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer.

Call for Papers: T-SIPN Special Issue on Distributed Information Processing in Social Networks

IEEE Signal Processing Society
IEEE Transactions on Signal and Information Processing over Networks
Special Issue on Distributed Information Processing in Social Networks

Over the past few decades, online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have significantly changed the way people communicate and share information with each other. The opinion and behavior of each individual are heavily influenced through interacting with others. These local interactions lead to many interesting collective phenomena such as herding, consensus, and rumor spreading. At the same time, there is always the danger of mob mentality of following crowds, celebrities, or gurus who might provide misleading or even malicious information. Many efforts have been devoted to investigating the collective behavior in the context of various network topologies and the robustness of social networks in the presence of malicious threats. On the other hand, activities in social networks (clicks, searches, transactions, posts, and tweets) generate a massive amount of decentralized data, which is not only big in size but also complex in terms of its structure. Processing these data requires significant advances in accurate mathematical modeling and computationally efficient algorithm design. Many modern technological systems such as wireless sensor and robot networks are virtually the same as social networks in the sense that the nodes in both networks carry disparate information and communicate with constraints. Thus, investigating social networks will bring insightful principles on the system and algorithmic designs of many engineering networks. An example of such is the implementation of consensus algorithms for coordination and control in robot networks. Additionally, more and more research projects nowadays are data-driven. Social networks are natural sources of massive and diverse big data, which present unique opportunities and challenges to further develop theoretical data processing toolsets and investigate novel applications. This special issue aims to focus on addressing distributed information (signal, data, etc.) processing problems in social networks and also invites submissions from all other related disciplines to present comprehensive and diverse perspectives. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Dynamic social networks: time varying network topology, edge weights, etc.
  • Social learning, distributed decision-making, estimation, and filtering
  • Consensus and coordination in multi-agent networks
  • Modeling and inference for information diffusion and rumor spreading
  • Multi-layered social networks where social interactions take place at different scales or modalities
  • Resource allocation, optimization, and control in multi-agent networks
  • Modeling and strategic considerations for malicious behavior in networks
  • Social media computing and networking
  • Data mining, machine learning, and statistical inference frameworks and algorithms for handling big data from social networks
  • Data-driven applications: attribution models for marketing and advertising, trend prediction, recommendation systems, crowdsourcing, etc.
  • Other topics associated with social networks: graphical modeling, trust, privacy, engineering applications, etc.

Important Dates:

Manuscript submission due: September 15, 2016
First review completed: November 1, 2016
Revised manuscript due: December 15, 2016
Second review completed: February 1, 2017
Final manuscript due: March 15, 2017
Publication: June 1, 2017

Guest Editors:

Zhenliang Zhang, Qualcomm Corporate R&D (zhenlian@qti.qualcomm.com)
Wee Peng Tay, Nanyang Technological University (wptay@ntu.edu.sg)
Moez Draief, Imperial College London (m.draief@imperial.ac.uk)
Xiaodong Wang, Columbia University (xw2008@columbia.edu)
Edwin K. P. Chong, Colorado State University (edwin.chong@colostate.edu)
Alfred O. Hero III, University of Michigan (hero@eecs.umich.edu)

ISIT 2015 : statistics and learning

The advantage of flying to Hong Kong from the US is that the jet lag was such that I was actually more or less awake in the mornings. I didn’t take such great notes during the plenaries, but they were rather enjoyable, and I hope that the video will be uploaded to the ITSOC website soon.

There were several talks on entropy estimation in various settings that I did not take great notes on, to wit:

  • OPTIMAL ENTROPY ESTIMATION ON LARGE ALPHABETS VIA BEST POLYNOMIAL APPROXIMATION (Yihong Wu, Pengkun Yang, University Of Illinois, United States)
  • DOES DIRICHLET PRIOR SMOOTHING SOLVE THE SHANNON ENTROPY ESTIMATION PROBLEM? (Yanjun Han, Tsinghua University, China; Jiantao Jiao, Tsachy Weissman, Stanford University, United States)
  • ADAPTIVE ESTIMATION OF SHANNON ENTROPY (Yanjun Han, Tsinghua University, China; Jiantao Jiao, Tsachy Weissman, Stanford University, United States)

I would highly recommend taking a look for those who are interested in this problem. In particular, it looks like we’re getting towards more efficient entropy estimators in difficult settings (online, large alphabet), which is pretty exciting.

QUICKEST LINEAR SEARCH OVER CORRELATED SEQUENCES
Javad Heydari, Ali Tajer, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, United States
This talk was about hypothesis testing where the observer can control the samples being taken by traversing a graph. We have an n-node graph (c.f. a graphical model) representing the joint distribution on n variables. The data generated is i.i.d. across time according to either F_0 or F_1. At each time you get to observe the data from only one node of the graph. You can either observe the same node as before, explore by observing a different node, or make a decision about whether the data from from F_0 or F_1. By adopting some costs for different actions you can form a dynamic programming solution for the search strategy but it’s pretty heavy computationally. It turns out the optimal rule for switching has a two-threshold structure and can be quite a bit different than independent observations when the correlations are structured appropriately.

MISMATCHED ESTIMATION IN LARGE LINEAR SYSTEMS
Yanting Ma, Dror Baron, North Carolina State University, United States; Ahmad Beirami, Duke University, United States
The mismatch studied in this paper is a mismatch in the prior distribution for a sparse observation problem y = Ax + \sigma_z z, where x \sim P (say a Bernoulli-Gaussian prior). The question is what happens when we do estimation assuming a different prior Q. The main result of the paper is an analysis of the excess MSE using a decoupling principle. Since I don’t really know anything about the replica method (except the name “replica method”), I had a little bit of a hard time following the talk as a non-expert, but thankfully there were a number of pictures and examples to help me follow along.

SEARCHING FOR MULTIPLE TARGETS WITH MEASUREMENT DEPENDENT NOISE
Yonatan Kaspi, University of California, San Diego, United States; Ofer Shayevitz, Tel-Aviv University, Israel; Tara Javidi, University of California, San Diego, United States
This was another search paper, but this time we have, say, K targets W_1, W_2, \ldots, W_K uniformly distributed in the unit interval, and what we can do is query at each time n a set S_n \subseteq [0,1] and get a response Y_n = X_n \oplus Z_n where X_n = \mathbf{1}( \exists W_k \in S_n ) and Z_n \sim \mathrm{Bern}( \mu(S_n) + b ) where \mu is the Lebesgue measure. So basically you can query a set and you get a noisy indicator of whether you hit any targets, where the noise depends on the size of the set you query. At some point \tau you stop and guess the target locations. You are (\epsilon,\delta) successful if the probability that you are within \delta of each target is less than \epsilon. The targeting rate is the limit of \log(1/\delta) / \mathbb{E}[\tau] as \epsilon,\delta \to 0 (I’m being fast and loose here). Clearly there are some connections to group testing and communication with feedback, etc. They show there is a significant gap between the adaptive and nonadaptive rate here, so you can find more targets if you can adapt your queries on the fly. However, since rate is defined for a fixed number of targets, we could ask how the gap varies with K. They show it shrinks.

ON MODEL MISSPECIFICATION AND KL SEPARATION FOR GAUSSIAN GRAPHICAL MODELS
Varun Jog, University of California, Berkeley, United States; Po-Ling Loh, University of Pennsylvania, United States
The graphical model for jointly Gaussian variables has no edge between nodes i and j if the corresponding entry (\Sigma^{-1})_{ij} = 0 in the inverse covariance matrix. They show a relationship between the KL divergence of two distributions and their corresponding graphs. The divergence is lower bounded by a constant if they differ in a single edge — this indicates that estimating the edge structure is important when estimating the distribution.

CONVERSES FOR DISTRIBUTED ESTIMATION VIA STRONG DATA PROCESSING INEQUALITIES
Aolin Xu, Maxim Raginsky, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, United States
Max gave a nice talk on the problem of minimizing an expected loss \mathbb{E}[ \ell(W, \hat{W}) ] of a d-dimensional parameter W which is observed noisily by separate encoders. Think of a CEO-style problem where there is a conditional distribution P_{X|W} such that the observation at each node is a d \times n matrix whose columns are i.i.d. and where the j-th row is i.i.d. according to P_{X|W_j}. Each sensor gets independent observations from the same model and can compress its observations to b bits and sends it over independent channels to an estimator (so no MAC here). The main result is a lower bound on the expected loss as s function of the number of bits latex b, the mutual information between W and the final estimate \hat{W}. The key is to use the strong data processing inequality to handle the mutual information — the constants that make up the ratio between the mutual informations is important. I’m sure Max will blog more about the result so I’ll leave a full explanation to him (see what I did there?)

More on Shannon theory etc. later!