AISTATS 2015: a few talks from one day

I attended AISTATS for about a day and change this year — unfortunately due to teaching I missed the poster I had there but Shuang Song presented a work on learning from data sources of different quality, which her work with Kamalika Chaudhuri and myself. This was my first AISTATS. It had single track of oral presentations and then poster sessions for the remaining papers. The difficulty with a single track for me is that my interest in the topics is relatively focused, and the format of a general audience with a specialist subject matter meant that I couldn’t get as much out of the talks as I would have wanted. Regardless, I did get exposed to a number of new problems. Maybe the ideas can percolate for a while and inform something in the future.

Computational Complexity of Linear Large Margin Classification With Ramp Loss
Søren Frejstrup Maibing, Christian Igel
The main result of this paper (I think) is that ERM under ramp loss is NP-hard. They gave the details of the reduction but since I’m not a complexity theorist I got a bit lost in the weeds here.

A la Carte — Learning Fast Kernels
Zichao Yang, Andrew Wilson, Alex Smola, Le Song
Ideas like “random kitchen sinks” and other kernel approximation methods require you to have a kernel you want to approximate, but in many problems you in fact need to learn the kernel from the data. If I give you a kernel function k(x,x') = k( |x - x'| ), then you can take the Fourier transform K(\omega) of k. This turns out to be a probability distribution, so you can sample random \{\omega_i\} i.i.d. and build a randomized Fourier approximation of k. If you don’t know the kernel function, or you have to learn it, then you could instead try to learn/estimate the transform directly. This paper was about trying to do that in a reasonably efficient way.

Learning Where to Sample in Structured Prediction
Tianlin Shi, Jacob Steinhardt, Percy Liang
This was about doing Gibbs sampling, not for MCMC sampling from the stationary distribution, but for “stochastic search” or optimization problems. The intuition was that some coordinates are “easier” than others, so we might want to focus resampling on the harder coordinates. But this might lead to inaccurate sampling. The aim here twas to build a heterogenous sampler that is cheap to compute and still does the right thing.

Tradeoffs for Space, Time, Data and Risk in Unsupervised Learning
Mario Lucic, Mesrob Ohannessian, Amin Karbasi, Andreas Krause
This paper won the best student paper award. They looked at a k-means problem where they do “data summarization” to make the problem a bit more efficient — that is, by learning over an approximation/summary of the features, they can find different tradeoffs between the running time, risk, and sample size for learning problems. The idea is to use coresets — I’d recommend reading the paper to get a better sense of what is going on. It’s on my summer reading list.

Averaged Least-Mean-Squares: Bias-Variance Trade-offs and Optimal Sampling Distributions
Alexandre Defossez, Francis Bach
What if you want to do SGD but you don’t want to sample the points uniformly? You’ll get a bias-variance tradeoff. This is another one of those “you have to read the paper” presentations. A nice result if you know the background literature, but if you are not a stochastic gradient aficionado, you might be totally lost.

Sparsistency of \ell_1-Regularized M-Estimators
Yen-Huan Li, Jonathan Scarlett, Pradeep Ravikumar, Volkan Cevher
In this paper they find a new condition, which they call local structured smoothness, which is sufficient for certain M-estimators to be “sparsistent” — that is, they recover the support pattern of a sparse parameter asymptotically as the number of data points goes to infinity. Examples include the LASSO, regression in general linear models, and graphical model selection.

Some of the other talks which were interesting but for which my notes were insufficient:

  • Two-stage sampled learning theory on distributions (Zoltan Szabo, Arthur Gretton, Barnabas Poczos, Bharath Sriperumbudur)
  • Generalized Linear Models for Aggregated Data (Avradeep Bhowmik, Joydeep Ghosh, Oluwasanmi Koyejo)
  • Efficient Estimation of Mutual Information for Strongly Dependent Variables (Shuyang Gao, Greg Ver Steeg, Aram Galstyan)
  • Sparse Submodular Probabilistic PCA (Rajiv Khanna, Joydeep Ghosh, Russell Poldrack, Oluwasanmi Koyejo)
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