Postdoc positions at UCLA in Coding Theory

I will write more about the IHP workshop! In the meantime, here are some exciting postdoc opportunities with my ex-classmate Lara Dolecek!

I’m writing to let you know that I have 2 postdoc positions available in my research group at UCLA, starting this summer. I am looking for talented students who want to work on one of the following:

  1. Coding theoretic methods and algorithms for emerging memories and modern computing systems
  2. New algorithms and coding-theoretic techniques for data management (data science)

Both projects are interdisciplinary. Postdocs will be working closely with me and a vibrant group of my graduate students, and will have the opportunity to collaborate with other researchers and to interact with our industry sponsors.

Strong background in mathematics and interest in interdisciplinary research are required.

I would greatly appreciate if you can pass this information to interested students.

Prospective students should contact me via email at dolecek@ee.ucla.edu

with subject line

[Prospective postdoc interested in LORIS research]

along with their CV and 3 selected publications. Students should plan to arrange for 2 letters of recommendation to be sent to the email address above.

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ISIT 2014: two more plenaries

As I wrote before, I took pretty woeful notes during ISIT this year, so I don’t have much to write about. Andrea Goldsmith’s plenary was about how we always say IT/Comm is dead, but she thinks we should be more sanguine about it. She presented a glimpse of some recent work with Stefano Rini on a unified approach for providing achievable results for single-hop networks using a graph to represent superposition coding and binning operations among the auxiliary variables. If it is actually as easy to use as advertised, it might save over the 23+ rate inequalities defining some achievable rate regions. The moral of the story is that it’s sometimes better to clean up our existing results a bit. I think the El-Gamal and Kim book did a great job of this for basic multiterminal IT, for example.

Vijay Kumar’s plenary was on codes for distributed storage and repair-bandwidth tradeoffs, focusing on extensions of the model. There was a lot of discussion of other code constructions, and how asking for certain properties (such as “locality”) can cost you something in the tradeoff. This is important when you can’t repair a code from arbitrary nodes in the network/data center — because there’s an underlying network which supplies the data for repair, codes should probably respect that network. At least that was the moral I took from this talk. Since I don’t work on coding, some things were a little over my head, but I thought he did an excellent job of keeping it accessible with nice concrete examples.