IPAM Workshop on Algorithmic Challenges in Protecting Privacy for Biomedical Data

IPAM is hosting a workshop on Algorithmic Challenges in Protecting Privacy for Biomedical Data” which will be held at IPAM from January 10-12, 2018.

The workshop will be attended by many junior as well as senior researchers with diverse backgrounds. We want to to encourage students or postdoctoral scholars who might be interested, to apply and/or register for this workshop.

I think it will be quite interesting and has the potential to spark a lot of interesting conversations around what we can and cannot do about privacy for medical data in general and genomic data in specific.

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Postdoctoral opportunity at NYU CS/Global Health

Post-doctoral opportunity in developing novel computational approaches for disease surveillance. The laboratory of Dr. Rumi Chunara in Computer Science & Engineering, and the College of Global of Public Health at New York University is seeking highly motivated researchers to develop and study crowdsourced and point-of-care data for understanding infectious and chronic disease in populations worldwide.

Ideal postdoctoral candidates will have a Ph.D. with a strong background in bioinformatics, biostatistics, computer science or related field. Expertise in statistical machine learning and/or data mining are required. Preferred requirements for this position include experience designing software applications and/or storing, retrieving, and analyze large datasets. Experience with R, Python, SQL, JavaScript is preferred. Experience in hacking with cloud technologies (e.g., AWS, Hadoop) is a big plus. You must demonstrate an interest or experience in working with biological data such as genomic sequence, syndromic surveillance or physiological data.

This is an exciting research area and New York City provides great opportunities for networking and support of innovative work. Our group is engaged in many high-profile studies in collaboration with startups and other groups. The selected post-doc will be supported and encouraged to generate high impact publications, gain experience in supervising students and in grant writing if interested. All applicants should send an updated CV to Rumi Chunara (rumi.chunara@nyu.edu).

Linkage

It’s been a busy week, deadline-wise, but I did see a few cool things on the interwebs which seemed worth sharing:

Tarantulas molting, courtesy of my high school biology teacher and ExploraVision coach extraordinare, Mr. Stone (his blog is cool too).

Keeping with the nature theme, find the cuttlefish!. The octopus video is cool too. Thanks to my commute being a bit longer, I listen to Science Friday podcasts as well as Story Collider, which is a pretty cool Moth-meets-science storytelling podcast.

Sometimes papers use pretty strong words in their titles (see for more context). On that note, some letters from John Nash (see also) were recently declassified by the NSA wherein he seems to predict fundamentals of cryptography and computational complexity. In more Rivest news, he coded up the cryptosystem.

In sadder news (also not so recent now), De Bruijn passed away. I’ve started a bioinformatics project recently (maybe more like “started”) and DeBruijn graphs are a pretty useful tool for making sense of data from next-generation sequencing technologies. Here are some animations describing how Illumina and 454 sequencing work.

Maybe when it gets warmer I will put together a worm bin — I miss the curbside composting of Berkeley.

I get a lot of positive comments about this shirt, but Topatoco are discontinuing it. Speaking of potatoes, Lav has a nice post with some links to papers on the importance and history of potatoes.