Signal boost: Postdoc positions at Tel Aviv University

Two postdoctoral research positions are now available in the Department of Electrical Engineering – Systems at Tel Aviv University, Israel, in the fields of information theory and interactive communications. Starting immediately for up to two years. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC).

We offer two postdoctoral fellowships for researchers in the broad area of information theory, with special emphasis on interactive communications. Specific topics of interest include single-user and multiuser communications with noisy feedback, iterative-refinement coding for two-way channels, interactive coding and its relations to dynamical systems and stochastic control, resource-limited interactive communications, distributed function computation, and combinatorial aspects of multiuser interactive communications. The research will be conducted in close collaboration with Dr. Ofer Shayevitz and his group, and is funded by a grant from the European Research Council (ERC).

The positions are available immediately and for a period of up to two years. Applicants should hold a PhD in either electrical engineering, computer science, or mathematics, and are expected to have a strong background in information theory or closely related fields. Remuneration is highly competitive and commensurate with skills and track record. To apply, please send your CV along with a short statement of research interests to Dr. Ofer Shayevitz at ofersha@eng.tau.ac.il.

Survey on Ac and post-Ac STEM PhD careers

One of the things about teaching in a more industry-adjacent field like electrical engineering is that the vast majority of PhDs do not go on to academic careers. The way in which we have traditionally structured our programs is somehow predicated on the idea that students will go on to be academic researchers themselves, and there’s a long argument about the degree to which graduate school should involve vocational training that can fill many a post-colloquium dinner discussion.

Since I know there are non-academic PhDs who read this, there’s a survey out from Harvard researcher Melanie Sinche that is trying to gather data on the career trajectories of PhDs. The title of the article linked above, “Help solve the mystery of the disappearing Ph.D.s,” sounds really off to me — I know where the people I know from grad school ended up, and a quick glance through LinkedIn show that the “where” is not so much the issue as “how many.” For example, we talk a lot about how so many people from various flavors of theory end up in finance, but is it 50%? I suspect the number is much lower. Here’s a direct link to the survey. Fill it out and spread widely!

Signal boost: Postdoc in Privacy at Penn State

Sofya Raskhodnikova and Adam Smith are looking to fill a postdoc position at Penn State for a multi-year project on privacy, streaming and learning.

Qualifications: Ph.D., with expertise in the theoretical foundations of at least one of the research areas (algorithms, machine learning and statistics, data privacy). Willingness to work on a cross-disciplinary project.

More about the project leaders: Sofya Raskhodnikova, Adam Smith.

Duration and compensation: At least one year, renewable. Start date is
negotiable, though we slightly prefer candidates starting fall 2015. Salary is competitive.

Applicants should email a CV, short research statement and list of references directly to the project leaders ({asmith,sofya}@cse.psu.edu) with “postdoc” in the subject line.

Location: The university is located in the beautiful college town of
State College in the center of Pennsylvania. The State College area has 130,000 inhabitants and offers a wide variety of cultural and outdoor recreational activities. The university offers outstanding events from collegiate sporting events to fine arts productions. Many major population centers on the east coast (New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington D.C., Baltimore) are only a few hours’ drive away and convenient air services to several major hubs are operated by three major airlines out of State College.

Penn State is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from underrepresented minorities.

CFP: 2015 Information Theory Workshop (ITW), Jeju Island

I am on the TPC for ITW 2015 in Jeju Island, South Korea.

The 2015 IEEE Information Theory Workshop will take place in Jeju Island, Korea, from October 11 to October 15, 2015. Jeju Island is the largest island in Korea and is located in the Pacific Ocean just off the south-western tip of the Korean peninsula. Jeju Island is a volcanic island with a mountainous terrain, a dramatic rugged coastline and spectacular watershed courses. The Island has a unique culture as well as natural beauty. It is a living folk village, with approximately 540,000 people. As a result of its isolated location and romantic tropical image, Jeju Island has become a favorite retreat with honeymooners and tourists. The tour programs of the conference will also provide participants with the opportunity to feel and enjoy some of the island’s fascinating attractions.

Special topics of emphasis include:

  • Big data
  • Coding theory
  • Communication theory
  • Computational biology
  • Interactive communication
  • Machine learning
  • Network information theory
  • Privacy and security
  • Signal processing

2015 Bellairs Workshop on Large-Scale Inference and Optimization

A few weeks ago I got to go to Bellairs in Holetown, Barbados for a workshop organized by Mike Rabbat and Mark Coates of McGill University. It’s a small workshop, mostly for Mike and Mark’s students, and it’s a chance to interact closely and perhaps start some new research collaborations. Here’s a brief summary of the workshop as I remember it from my notes.

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Readings

The Magician’s Land [Lev Grossman] : The finale of Grossman’s series. In a sense it had all the right pieces, but somehow it felt less specific and grounded to me, perhaps because the world was no longer “new” or because I felt like there was a need to “finish things up.” Of course, if you read the first two you have to read this one, so it’s not like I could not-recommend it. I was still quite enjoyable.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage [Haruki Murakami]: This also felt a bit slight with respect to other books of Murakami, but also “clean” in a way that I appreciated. I also now have to listen to more Liszt. Tsukuru Tazaki feels “colorless” and empty, shunned by his old childhood friends. He finally tries to seek out why, which turns out to be more surprising than he thought. As with much of Murakami’s work, the “mysteriousness” of women has this negative tint that makes me uncomfortable. This book, unlike 1Q84 or others, has very little magical realism going on, so it could be a good recommendation for someone who is less of a fan of that aspect of Murakami’s work.

Soy Sauce For Beginners [Kirstin Chen]: The story of Gretchen Lin, a 30-year old who has moved back to Singapore from SF to work at the family soy sauce factory after her marriage fell apart, this novel is part Gretchen’s painful journey towards self-discovery and resolution with her family, and partly an introduction to Singapore for the non-familiar reader. The latter part will appeal to some but at times I wanted less explanation and to be forced into trying to make sense of cultural elements myself. In this sense it’s a sort of novel of cultural translation. That being said, the best part of this book is how true and messy the story really felt. The family (and business) are dysfunctional, and Gretchen has a lot to come to terms with regarding herself, her marriage, and her relationship to this family.

The Name of The Wind / The Wise Man’s Fear [Patrick Rothfuss] : I should make myself promise to not read epic fantasy series that are not completed. Told in a kind of story-within-a-story, these books were a great way to unwind over the vacation. If you like those bards plus wizards coming of age stories, this one is for you. Also: plenty of unrequited love.

The Lowland [Jhumpa Lahiri] : I had read the opening of this book as a short story, but the novel is another beast entirely. Two brothers in Kolkata, one a Naxalite, the other looking to go to grad school in the US, and a torn apart and stitched together family in the US. While reading this I kept thinking of the movie Boyhood, which rather abruptly jumped years into the future to catch the family’s story at another time. This book does the same, but the shifts felt more jarring to me; I did not understand who there characters were quite as well. I think I had to suspend my disbelief a few times for some of the narrative choices. However, in retrospect it is because I think I didn’t quite get the characters, or I had misconceptions. Regardless, I think this is a story that helps complicate the story of middle-class Indian immigrant families, and is worth giving a read.

House of Suns [Alastair Reynolds] : Space opera, on a grand scale, but still grounded in our galaxy with humans, rather than the more distant and alien Culture novels of Banks. As Cosma would put it, mind candy, and a nice beach read.

ISIT Deadline Extended to Monday

Apparently not everyone got this email, so here it is. I promise this blog will not become PSA-central.

Dear ISIT-2015-Submission Reviewers:

In an effort to ensure that each paper has an appropriate number of reviews, the deadline for the submission of all reviews has been extended to March 2nd. If you have not already done so, please submit your review by March 2nd as we are working to a very tight deadline.

In filling out your review, please keep in mind that

(a) all submissions are eligible to be considered for presentation in a semi-plenary session — Please ensure that your review provides an answer to Question 11
(b) in the case of a submission that is eligible for the 2015 IEEE Jack Keil Wolf ISIT Student Paper Award, the evaluation form contains a box at the top containing the text:
Notice: This paper is to be considered for the 2015 IEEE Jack Keil Wolf ISIT Student Paper Award, even if the manuscript itself does not contain a statement to that effect.
– Please ensure that your review provides an answer to Question 12 if this is the case.

Thanks very much for helping out with the review process for ISIT, your inputs are of critical importance in ensuring that the high standards of an ISIT conference are maintained. We know that reviewing a paper takes much effort and we are grateful for all the time you have put in!

With regards,

Pierre, Suhas and Vijay
(TPC Co-Chairs, ISIT 2015)